A BiT or BRET, Which is Better?

Now that Promega is expanding its offerings of options for examining live-cell protein interactions or quantitation at endogenous protein expression levels, we in Technical Services are getting the question about which option is better. The answer is, as with many assays… it depends! First let’s talk about what are the NanoBiT and NanoBRET technologies, and then we will provide some similarities and differences to help you choose the assay that best suits your individual needs. Continue reading “A BiT or BRET, Which is Better?”

Probing RGS:Gα Protein Interactions with NanoBiT Assays

gpcr_in_membrane_on_white2When I was a post-doc at UT Southwestern, I was fortunate to interact with two Nobel prize winners, Johann Deisenhofer and Fred Gilman.  Johann once helped me move a -80°C freezer into his lab when we lost power in my building. I once replaced my boss at small faculty mixer with a guest speaker and had a drink with Fred Gilman and several other faculty members from around the university. Among the faculty, one professor had a cell phone on his belt, an odd sight in 1995. Fred Gilman asked him what it was and why he had it. It was so his lab could notify him of good results anytime of the day. Fred laughed and told him to get rid of it – if it’s good data, it will survive until morning.

I was reminded of this story when I read a recent paper by Bodle, C.R. et al (1) about the development of a NanoBiT® Complementation Assay (2) to measure interactions of Regulators of G Protein Signaling (RGS) with Gα proteins in cells. (Fred Gilman was the first to isolate a G protein and that led to him being a co-recipient of the Nobel Prize in 1994). The authors created over a dozen NanoBiT Gα:RGS domain pairs and found they could classify different RGS proteins by the speed of the interaction in a cellular context. The interactions were readily reversible with known inhibitors and were suitable for high-throughput screening due to Z’ factors exceeding 0.5. The study paves the way for future work to identify broad spectrum RGS domain:Gα inhibitors and even RGS domain-specific inhibitors. This is the second paper applying NanoBiT Technology to GPCR studies (3).

A Little Background…
A primary function of GPCRs is transmission of extracellular signals across the plasma membrane via coupling with intracellular heterotrimeric G proteins. Upon receptor stimulation, the Gα subunit dissociates from the βγ subunit, initiating the cascade of downstream second messenger pathways that alter transcription (4). The Gα subunits are actually slow GTPases that propagate signals when GTP is bound but shutdown and reassociate with the βγ subunit when GTP is cleaved to GDP. This activation process is known as the GTPase cycle. G proteins are extremely slow GTPases. Continue reading “Probing RGS:Gα Protein Interactions with NanoBiT Assays”

Studying Mitochondrial Fission with NanoBiT Complementation Assay

Vote for NanoBiT™ in the Scientist's Choice Awards and get a chance to win a $500.00 US Amazon voucher from Select Science.
Vote for NanoBiT™ in the Scientist’s Choice Awards and get a chance to win a $500.00 US Amazon voucher from Select Science.

Motivation
It’s a new year. Whether you’re a self-improvement fanatic or just ready for good things to start happening, you’ve got a plan. You might be changing up an old exercise routine or trying a new cooking technique.

And at work, you are digging deeper; this is the year you illuminate the protein interactions that you’ve previously not been able to visualize.

Good news. There is a new protein complementation assay that can help. Studying-mitochondrial-fission-poster

About NanoBiT
NanoBiT™ Complementation Reporter is a recently developed protein interaction assay that features the improved NanoLuc® luciferase. NanoLuc, originally isolated from a deep sea shrimp, is a small luciferase that provides a much brighter signal than firefly luciferase.

About Split Luciferase Systems
If you’re interrogating two proteins to understand the conditions under which they interact, a split luciferase system enables you to tag each protein with a luciferase subunit. Interaction of the tagged proteins facilitates the complementation of the subunits, resulting in a luminescent signal. Continue reading “Studying Mitochondrial Fission with NanoBiT Complementation Assay”

Key Advances in PPI Research

small linkedin thumbnailOur understanding of the microscopic world has been shaped by the tools available to monitor and visualize cellular interactions. We “stand on the shoulders of giants” to propel our research to even greater heights. Studying protein-protein interactions (PPI) has proved fruitful for our understanding of cellular metabolism, signal transduction, and more. Scientists are starting to build whole organism interactomes (kindred to the metabolome and genome) that could have huge implications towards understanding and treating disease. Let us take a trip down memory lane to see where we have come from.  Continue reading “Key Advances in PPI Research”

NanoBiT™ Assay: Transformational Technology for Studying Protein Interactions Named a Top 10 Innovation of 2015

21416943-wb-cr-uw-nanobit-pm-page-hero
For three out of the last four years, we have been honored to have one of our key technologies named a Top 10 Innovation by The Scientist. This year the innovative NanoBiT™ Assay (NanoLuc® Binary Technology) received the recognition. NanoBiT™ is a structural complementation reporter based on NanoLuc® Luciferase, a small, bright luciferase derived from the deep sea shrimp Oplophorus gracilirostris.

Using plasmids that encode the NanoBiT complementation reporter, you can make fusion proteins to “report” on protein interactions that you are studying. One of the target proteins is fused to the 18kDa subunit; the other to the 11 amino acid subunit. The NanoBiT™ subunits are stable, exhibiting low self-affinity, but produce an ultra-bright signal upon association. So, if your target proteins interact, the two subunits are brought close enough to each other to associate and produce a luminescent signal. The strong signal and low background associated with a luminescent system, and the small size of the complementation reporter, all help the NanoBiT™ assay overcome the limitations associated with traditional methods for studying protein interactions.

The small size reduces the chances of steric interference with protein interactions. The ultra bright signal, means that even interactions among proteins present in very low amounts can be detected and quantified–without over-expressing large quantities of non-native fusion proteins and potentially disrupting the normal cellular environment. And the NanoBiT™ assay can be performed in real time, in live cells.

The NanoBiT™ assay is already being deployed in laboratories to help advance understanding of fundamental cell biology. You can see how one researcher is already taking full advantage of this innovative technology in the video embedded below:

Visit the Promega web site to see more examples more examples how the NanoBiT™ assay can break through the traditional limitations for studying protein interactions in cells.

You can read the Top 10 article in The Scientist here.

About the Development of an Improved BRET Assay: NanoBRET

"Protein BRD4 PDB 2oss" by Emw - Own work. Licensed under CC BY-SA 3.0 via Wikimedia Commons - https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Protein_BRD4_PDB_2oss.png#/media/File:Protein_BRD4_PDB_2oss.png
“Protein BRD4 PDB 2oss” by Emw – Own work. Licensed under CC BY-SA 3.0 via Wikimedia Commons – https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Protein_BRD4_PDB_2oss.png#/media/File:Protein_BRD4_PDB_2oss.png

One of the more exciting reporter molecules technologies available came online in the past year, with the launch of the Promega NanoBRET™ technology. While it’s easy for me, a science writer at Promega, to brag, seriously, this is a very cool protein interactions tool.

A few of the challenges facing protein-protein interactions researchers include:

  • The ability to quantitatively characterize protein-protein interactions
  • Ability to examine protein-protein interactions in situ, in the context of the living cell

A goal of the NanoBRET™ developers was to improve the sensitivity and dynamic range of traditional BRET technology, in order to address these challenges.

In May 2015 these researchers published an article outlining their efforts to create NanoBRET technology in ACS Chemical Biology, in an article entitled, “NanoBRET—A Novel BRET Platform for the Analysis of Protein-Protein Interactions”. Here is a brief look at their work.

Continue reading “About the Development of an Improved BRET Assay: NanoBRET”

If We Could But Peek Inside the Cell …Quantifying, Characterizing and Visualizing Protein:Protein  Interactions

14231183 WB MS Protein Interactions Hero Image 600x214Robert Hooke first coined the term “cell” after observing  plant cell walls through a light microscope—little empty chambers, fixed in time and space. However,  cells are anything but fixed.

Cells are dynamic: continually responding to a shifting context of time, environment, and signals from within and without. Interactions between the macromolecules within cells, including proteins, are ever changing—with complexes forming, breaking up, and reforming in new ways. These interactions provide a temporal and special framework for the work of the cell, controlling gene expression, protein production, growth, cell division and cell death.

Visualizing and measuring these fluid interactions at the level of the cell without perturbing them is the goal of every cell biologist.

A recent article by Thomas Machleidt et al. published in ACS Chemical Biology, describes a new technology that brings us closer to being able to realize that goal. Continue reading “If We Could But Peek Inside the Cell …Quantifying, Characterizing and Visualizing Protein:Protein  Interactions”

Uncovering Protein Autoinhibition Using NanoBRET™ Technology

13305818-protein ligandIntroducing new assays or technologies is meant to make it easier for you to perform research and craft experiments to test hypotheses. However, scientists are creative people, and new technologies or assays may just be the catalyst for a crucial experiment or new data you are seeking. In the case of a recent Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences USA article, Wang et al. used the principle of our NanoBRET™ assay to understand how ERK1/2 phosphorylation of Rabin8, a guanine nucleotide exchange factor, influenced its configuration and subsequent activation of Rab8, a protein that regulates exocytosis. Continue reading “Uncovering Protein Autoinhibition Using NanoBRET™ Technology”

Detecting Inhibition of Protein Interactions in vivo

Protein Interactions with NanoBRETIn a paper published in the September issue of ACS Medicinal Chemistry Letters, researchers from GlaxoSmithKline in the UK and Germany report on the discovery, binding mode and structure:activity relationship of a new, potent BRPF1 (bromodomain and PHD finger containing protein family) inhibitor. This paper came to our attention as it is one of the first publications to apply Promega NanoBRET technology in an vivo assay that reversibly measures the interaction of protein partners. The technology enabled the identification of a novel inhibitor compound that disrupts the chromatin binding of this relatively unstudied class of bromodomain proteins.

What exactly are bromodomains and why do they matter?
Bromodomains are regions (~100 amino acids) within chromatin regulator proteins that recognize and “read” acetylated lysine residues on histones. These acetylated lysines act as docking stations for regulatory protein complexes via binding of the bromodomain region. Because of their role in chromatin binding and gene regulation, bromodomains have attracted interest as potential targets for anti-cancer treatments. Although some bromodomain-containing proteins (e.g., those in the bromodomain and extraterminal domain (BET) subfamily) are well characterized and have been identified as potential therapeutic targets, others are less well understood. Continue reading “Detecting Inhibition of Protein Interactions in vivo”

Using an Improved Bioluminescence Resonance Energy Transfer Technology to Monitor Bromodomain Histone Interactions

NanoBRET™ TechnologyTraditional techniques for studying protein:protein interactions (e.g., affinity capture or mass spectrometry) are limited in that they present a static picture of what is a dynamic process. To gain a more accurate and complete picture of interactions, they need to be studied n the context of the cellular environment within which they occur. In the webinar: Monitoring Protein:Protein Interactions in Living Cells Using NanoBRET™ Technology, Dr. Danette Daniels presented an improved Bioluminescence Resonance Energy Transfer (BRET) Technology that was developed to specifically study dynamic interactions in living cells. The NanoBRET™ Technology combines the small, extremely bright NanoLuc® Luciferase as the donor with a fluorescently labeled HaloTag® protein fusion tag as the acceptor to form a BRET assay. This assay offers an increased signal and decreased spectral overlap compared to other BRET technologies. Among other things, these features provide a larger signal range and the brightness of the NanoLuc® Luciferase enables protein:protein interaction analysis even with the donor protein expressed at low levels. Continue reading “Using an Improved Bioluminescence Resonance Energy Transfer Technology to Monitor Bromodomain Histone Interactions”