One Year Later: Living Organ Donor & Recipient Share Their Story

Jim and John one year later.

John Van Herwynen, Promega Senior Production Scientist, and Jim Stevens, Product Finishing Project Coordinator, on the Promega Madison campus one year after John donated one of his kidneys to Jim.

This article was jointly written by science writer, Nicole Sandler, and Corporate Affairs Communication Specialist, Karen Burkhartzmeyer.

One year ago, on September 14, 2016, two people once connected only through the common denominator of their workplace began sharing a bond that very few people ever experience. That was the day that Jim Stevens, Product Finishing Project Coordinator at Promega Madison, received a kidney from living donor John Van Herwynen, a Promega Senior Production Scientist. The last year, full of emotional successes but also some challenging setbacks, is one that has transformed both of their lives. Organ donor and organ recipient are marking today’s important milestone by sharing their remarkable story. Continue reading

STR-Validator: Open Source, Free Software for Evaluating Validation Data in the Forensic Laboratory

Before an established method or procedure can be employed in a forensic laboratory, an internal validation must be completed to show that the method performs as expected. Guidelines for validation are outlined by the Scientific Working Group on DNA Analysis Methods (SWGDAM) and the European Network of Forensic Science Institutes (ENFSI) DNA Working Group. Validation experiments that meet these guidelines will demonstrate the sensitivity and reliability of a short tandem repeat (STR) typing multiplex system. After a lab completes these validation experiments, it will have sufficient data to determine the analytical and stochastic thresholds of the capillary electrophoresis (CE) instrument in combination with the amplification system, the impact of multiple contributors to a DNA sample and the limit of detection and accuracy of the assay.

Such forensic lab validations are time consuming and can be intimidating, and the requirement to validate new technologies and systems is often seen as a deterrent to the adoption of new technologies or improved chemistries in a forensics laboratories. Any tools or tips that can reduce the barrier of validation, may also help the field of DNA forensics implement new technologies more quickly.

On October 1, Oskar Hansson, from the Department of Forensic Medical Services at Oslo University Hospital, will be leading a workshop entitled “Efficient Validation Using STR-Validator” as part of ISHI 28. This workshop introduces the free, open-source STR-Validator software tool that is designed to assist forensic laboratories in the evaluation of validation data. STR-validator is a free and open source R-package developed mainly for internal validation of forensic STR DNA typing kit. However, it is equally suited for validation of other methods and instruments, or for process control. The graphical user interface of the software enables easy analysis of data exported from software programs like GeneMapper® software, without any knowledge about R commands. The software also provides convenient functions to import, view, edit, and export data. After completed analysis, the results, plots, heat-maps, and data can be saved for easy access. Currently, analysis modules for stutter, balance, drop-out, concordance, mixtures, precision, pull-up, result types, and analytical threshold are available. STR-validator can greatly increase the speed of validation by reducing the time and effort needed for analysis of the validation data.

The workshop will include lectures and demonstrations to introduce STR-Validator as an efficient tool for the analysis of validation data in accordance with ENFSI recommendations and SWGDAM guidelines. This workshop is suitable for DNA analysts, technicians and QA/QC managers.

Have you registered for ISHI 28 in Seattle? Check it out. This year’s panel discussion will take up the topic of familial searching. Preregister for workshops. Read speaker bios.

Interested in more tips for smoother validation in your lab? This blog has several suggestions.

Promega Third Party Forensic-Grade Certification

Promega has become the first major forensic manufacturer to achieve third party certification of the published ISO 18385 standard to minimize the risk of human DNA contamination in products used to collect, store and analyze biological material for forensic purposes.

On February 2, 2016, ISO 18385:2016 was published as the first international standard specific to the forensic manufacturing community. Since the standard was published, companies have begun to self-declare that they comply with the ISO standard. Some companies have gone a step further and reached out to Certification Bodies to provide an unbiased and independent assessment their compliance to ISO18385 through a third-party audit.

When consumers see an ‘ISO 18385 Forensic Grade’ labeled product, it should inspire confidence that the product was produced in accordance with a minimum set of criteria common to all manufacturers.

So what are you actually getting in a Forensic Grade labeled product? Continue reading

Promega Tech Tours 2017: The Power to Solve for the Forensic Community

Governor John Bel Edwards of Louisiana made an appearance at the Promega Technology Tour in Baton Rouge. Pictures courtesy of Forensic Scientists at the Louisiana State Police.

2017 finds Promega on the road visiting cities all across the United States. This year we are presenting workshops from leaders in the forensics community on topics like maximizing success with challenging samples, improving laboratory efficiency and reducing backlogs, and new tools and technologies for the forensics laboratory. This highly popular workshop series is a great way to learn from your peers about new techniques and workflows and network with other forensics experts in your region.

There are several more tours left between now and the end of 2017. Find out if we are coming to a city near you and register today!

Meet Jon Drobac, Manager Global Technical Support and Training on the Spectrum CE Team

29160613_lPromega will introduce the Spectrum CE System for forensic and paternity analysis. Building this system requires the efforts of many people from many disciplines–from our customers who have told us their needs to the engineers and scientists building the instrument and ensuring its performance. Periodically we will introduce our Promega Connections readers to a team member so that you can have a sneak peak and behind-the-scenes look at Spectrum CE System  and the people who are creating it (of course if you truly want to be the first to know, sign up at www.promega.com/spectrum to receive regular, exclusive updates about Spectrum CE).

Today we introduce Jon Drobac, Global Technical Support and Training Manager.
Continue reading

All Aglow in the Ocean Deep

 

Fascinating bioluminescent creature floating on dark waters of the ocean. Polychaete tomopteris.

Today’s blog comes to you from the Promega North America Branch Office.

In nature, the ability to “glow” is actually quite common. Bioluminescence, the chemical reaction involving the molecule luciferin, is a useful adaptation for many lifeforms. Fireflies, mushrooms and creatures of the ocean deep use their internal lightshows to cope with a variety of situations. Used for hunting, communicating, ridding cells of oxygen, and simply surviving in the darkness of the ocean depths, bioluminescence is one of nature’s more flashy, and advantageous traits.

In new research published in April in the journal Scientific Reports, MBARI researchers Séverine Martini and Steve Haddock found that three-quarters of all sea animals make their own light.  The study reviewed 17 years of video from Monterey Bay, Calif in oceans that descended to 2.5 miles, to determine the commonality of bioluminescence in the deep waters.

Martini and Haddock’s observations concluded that 76 percent off all observed animals produced some light, including 97 to 99.7 cnidarians (jellyfish), half of fish, and most polychaetes (worms), cephalopods (squid), and crustaceans (shrimp).

Most of us are familiar with the fabled anglerfish, the menacing deep-sea creature known for attracting ignorant prey with a glowing lure attached to their head. As you descend below 200 meters, where light no longer penetrates, you will be surprised at the unexpected color display of the oceans’ sea life. Bioluminescence is not simply an exotic phenomenon, but an important ecological trait that the oceans’ sea creatures have wholeheartedly adopted to cope with complete darkness. Continue reading

Don’t Let These Three Common Issues Hurt Your Luminescent Assay Results

4621CAThere is a lot riding on your luminescent assay results. Each plate represents precious time, effort and resources. Did you know that there are three things about your detection instrument that can impact how much useful information you get from each plate?  Instruments with poor sensitivity may cause you to miss low-level samples that could be the “hit” you are looking for.  Instruments with a narrow detection range limit the accuracy or reproducibility you needed to repeat your work.  Finally, instruments that let the signal from bright wells spill into adjacent wells allow crosstalk to occur and skew experimental results, costing you time and leading to failed or repeated experiments. Continue reading

Bones: Improved Technology is Bringing Loved Ones Home

21537407 - archeology, human bonesToday’s Promega Connections blog is written by guest blogger Rachel H. Oefelein, QA Manager/Senior DNA Analyst at DNA Labs International. 

Shakespeare said, “The evil that men do lives after them; the good is oft interred with their bones.”  This is continually true in the case of unidentified remains throughout the United States.  The action of a person going missing or the events leading to an individual’s demise are frequently the memory that haunts a town or the media for years to come. However, for each such case, somewhere lies a set of skeletal remains not yet found, or just as tragic, recovered but still unidentified.  The National Missing and Unidentified Persons System (NamUs) estimates approximately 40,000 sets of unidentified skeletal remains linger in morgues around the country or that have been cremated and buried as Jane and John Does.

Many crime labs do not have protocols in place for the extraction of DNA from skeletal remains or have outdated protocols for bone extraction that are not sensitive enough for poor quality bones. Bones are often recovered from harsh environments and have been exposed to extreme heat, time, acidic soil, swamp, chemicals treatment, etc. These harsh environmental conditions degrade the DNA present in the remains which further complicates the already difficult procedure of releasing the DNA in cells buried deep within the bone matrix. Another challenge is that cases often involve recovery of skeletal remains in areas with animal activity, water recoveries and scenes involving explosions or fires; these case types may require re-association of dozens if not hundreds of bones and bone fragments. Continue reading

Researchers Gather at Promega Madison Campus for Annual Stem Cell Symposium

stemcell header

Since the derivation of human-derived embryonic stem cells (ES cells) in the 1990’s, the world of stem cell biology and engineering has proceeded at an amazing pace. The isolation pluripotent cells (iPS) cells that have most of the properties of embryonic stem cells from somatic tissues has been possible for nearly a decade. Engineered human cells, tissues, and organ-like structures are becoming a reality and may soon play a part in treating diseases. ES and iPS cells are teaching us much about how cells become specialized during normal development and the pathologies that result when those specialization decisions go wrong.

At the 12th Annual Wisconsin Stem Cell Symposium held at the BioPharmaceutical Technology Center institute, leading researchers from around the world will be gathered to discuss the latest progress, roadblocks and issues around Engineering Cells and Tissues for Discovery and Therapy.

The Symposium is co-coordinated by the Stem Cell & Regenerative Medicine Center at the University of Wisconsin-Madison and the BioPharmaceutical Technology Center Institute and is open to the public. Registration is $100.00 ($50.00 for students and post-doctoral researchers). The Symposium will be held at Promega Corporation’s BioPharmaceutical Technology Center, 5445 E. Cheryl Parkway, Fitchburg, WI.

Topics to be discussed include: Continue reading

Meet Katie Herbrand, Genetic Identity Supervisor on the Spectrum Team

29160613_lPromega will introduce the Spectrum CE System for forensic and paternity analysis. Building this system requires the efforts of many people from many disciplines–from our customers who have told us their needs to the engineers and scientists building the instrument and ensuring its performance. Periodically we will introduce our Promega Connections readers to a team member so that you can have a sneak peak and behind-the-scenes look at Spectrum CE System  and the people who are creating it (of course if you truly want to be the first to know, sign up at www.promega.com/spectrum to receive regular, exclusive updates about Spectrum CE).

Today we introduce Katie Herbrand, Genetic Identity Supervisor in Production. Continue reading