Shifting Conservation Status: Endangered Species Get a Second Chance

On May 21st, 2021 we celebrate National Endangered Species Day. This day helps raise awareness and increase knowledge of endangered species and wildlife, in hopes to save them. We have been lucky enough to collaborate with organizations and partners to help save species that were on the brink of extinction. Take a look at some species that are hoping for a second chance to survive and thrive.

Kit Elizabeth Ann the Black-Footed Ferret

Picture of black footed ferret Elizabeth Anne, one of the endangered species that Revive & Restore is working on.

In February 2018, resurrection efforts began for the then endangered black-footed ferret. With the help of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Revive and Restore, partners ViaGen Pets & Equine, San Diego Zoo Global, and the Association of Zoos and Aquariums, the successful cloning of a black-footed ferret was announced in February 2021. “Elizabeth Ann” was cloned from Willa, a female ferret that died in 1988, using somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). Elizabeth Ann’s genetic variants reveal a lot of much-needed hope for the genetic diversity of wild ferrets. Check out the full story on Elizabeth Ann’s journey here!

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Making Life Better for Man’s Best Friend: Onchocerca lupi Biomarker Characterization by Mass Spec

A tiny worm called Onchocerca lupi can make life uncomfortable for both humans and their best friends. This thread-like nematode is found in the eyes or under the skin of infected animals. Historically, diagnosis required skin biopsy or surgical removal of ocular tissue, but a recent study demonstrates a new non-invasive diagnostic tool for infection by Onchocerca lupi in dogs.

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Comparing Methods for Detecting SARS-CoV-2 in Wastewater

Image of coronavirus superimposed over laboratory tech performing an experiment. Methods for detecting SARS-CoV-2 in wastewater are becoming standardized.

Wastewater surveillance of SARS-CoV-2 is an increasingly common method for monitoring the spread of COVID-19 within a community. As researchers and public health officials around the world are working together to set up wastewater surveillance systems, there is an urgent need to establish standard SARS-CoV-2 detection methods.

A key leader in this new field is Dr. Gloria Sanchez. She is a tenured scientist at the Institute of Agrochemistry and Food Technology, a center within the Spanish National Research Council. Before the COVID-19 pandemic, her team focused on detecting human enteric viruses in food and water. But soon, detecting SARS-CoV-2 in wastewater became their main focus.

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Measuring Changing Metabolism in Cancer Cells

Because of the central role of energy metabolism in health and disease, and its effect on other cellular processes, assays to monitor changes in cellular metabolic state have wide application in both basic research and drug discovery. In the webinar “Tools for Cell Metabolism: Bioluminescent NAD(P)/NAD(P)H-Glo™ Assays” Jolanta Vidurigiene, a Senior Research Scientist at Promega, introduces three metabolism assays for measuring oxidized and reduced forms of NAD and NADP.

In this webinar, Jolanta provides background information on why it is important to be able to accurately measure metabolites such as NAD/NADH and NADP/NADPH. She outlines the roles of each, and highlights some of the challenges involved in developing assays that can accurately measure these metabolites. She discusses key considerations for successful NAD(P)/NAD(P)H assays and provides examples of how to use these assays to measure either total (both oxidized and reduced) forms of NAD and NADP, or to measure oxidized and reduced forms individually in a single assay plate.

NAD(P)H-Glo™ Assay Mechanism
NAD(P)H-Glo™ Assay Mechanism

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Directed Targeted Protein Degradation with Pre-Built HiBiT Cell Lines

Recently, selectively targeting proteins for degradation using the cell’s natural ubiquitin proteasome pathway (UPS) has surfaced as an effective strategy to bypass difficult-to-drug proteins related to diseases like cancer. Using sensitive bioluminescence technology, CRISPR-edited cell lines can facilitate studying popular protein degradation targets.

Woman at lab bench and artist 3D rendering of directed targeted protein degradation in a HiBiT cell line

NanoLuc® Luciferase (NLuc) has made biology more accessible than ever (1). Further experimentation with NLuc led to creation of a protein complementation system (2) and the discovery of the HiBiT bioluminescent peptide. HiBiT combines spontaneously with the engineered complementary subunit LgBiT to yield an active luciferase called NanoBiT® Luciferase.

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There’s a Vaccine for That—Could mRNA Vaccines be Used to Prevent Cancer Recurrence?

mRNA vaccines came roaring onto the public stage in 2020. In the United States and Europe, two of the vaccines that are being used against the SARS-CoV-2 virus are mRNA vaccines. The scientific community has been talking about the potential of this technology against infectious diseases as well as cancer for several years, but no one thought that the first mRNA vaccines would make such a huge, and public, debut.

One big benefit of mRNA vaccines is the speed at which they can be developed. mRNA vaccines use messenger RNA particles to teach our cells to make a bit of protein, which then triggers our body’s immune response, and it is relatively easy to synthesize large amounts of mRNA in a laboratory. As promising as this sounds for infectious diseases, the application of mRNA vaccines for oncology might be even more exciting.

Could mRNA vaccines be used for personalized cancer vaccines?
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The Path is Clear: Trypsin Platinum is Here!

Mass spectrometry depends on the successful digestion of proteins using proteases. Many commercially available proteomic-grade trypsins contain natural contaminants that produce non-specific cleavages. Trypsin Platinum, a new protease from Promega provides maximum specificity, giving you cleaner and more conclusive data from mass spec.

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A New Method to Detect Cholangiocarcinoma Biomarkers

Cholangiocarcinoma biomarkers were identified and quantitated using mass spectrometry

A new study in Nature Scientific Reports describes a method for detecting Cholangiocarcinoma biomarkers in extracellular vesicles.

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The Wild Genomes Program: Optimizing Conservation Outcomes Using Genomics

Although it is easy to get swept up in the dark year that was 2020, one advantage of overwhelming darkness is it makes it easier to find the bright spots, the beacons of hope, the people working to make the world a better place. One of these bright spots was the launch of Wild Genomes, a new biobanking and genome sequencing program through Revive & Restore.

Back in 2018, the Catalyst Science Fund was established by Revive & Restore with a 3-year pledge from Promega for $1 million annually. The purpose of the fund is to help support proof-of-concept projects and to advance the development of new biotechnology tools to address some of the most challenging and urgent problems in conservation that currently lack viable solutions, including genetic bottlenecks, invasive species, climate change and wildlife diseases. 

Through this fund, the Wild Genomes program was launched, with the goal of getting sequencing and biobanking tools into the hands of people working to protect biodiversity right now, and to help support them in applying genomic technologies towards their wildlife conservation efforts.

In their first request for proposals , the competitive Wild Genomes program received over 58 applications from researchers in 19 different countries, all of which aimed to address various species conservation issues using applied genomic technologies. The second round of projects, to be announced this Spring, will focus solely on marine species. Take a look at these first 11 amazing projects that have been awarded funding and the species conservation challenges they are taking on below:

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Observing the Human Developmental Clock with Bioluminescence Live-Cell Imaging

What is the Developmental Clock?

The development of the human embryo is a complicated process that involves careful coordination of thousands of genes. Just like musical instruments in an orchestra, each gene performs its role—sometimes silent, sometimes intense—but always right on cue. The tempo of the symphony, or the speed of embryonic development, depends on an intrinsic biological clock known as the developmental clock. The developmental clock is like the conductor of the orchestra, controlling the tempo of the music and ensuring that each gene is expressed at the right moment with the right intensity. If just one gene is expressed too soon or going one beat too fast, it could disrupt the harmony of the whole symphony, resulting in an improperly developed embryo.

One example of what could happen when the developmental clock is disrupted is a disease called spondylocostal dysostosis (SCDO). SCDO is a genetic disorder that causes abnormal formation of the spine and ribs. Patients often have a short neck and trunk, and an abnormal curvature in the spine (scoliosis). SCDO can be caused by a mutation in the HES7 gene. HES7 is an “oscillating gene”, a kind of gene that is expressed in a rhythmic pattern—like the beating of a drum. This rhythm is essential for forming our ribs and each vertebra of our spine—a process known as “segmentation”—during early embryonic development.

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