MSI Testing of Tumor Cells for Better Tailored Treatment

There are as many different cancers as there are people with cancer. Unlike infectious diseases, which are caused by pathogens that are foreign to our bodies (bacteria, viruses, parasites), cancer cells arise from our body—our own cells gone rogue. Because cancer is a dysfunction of a person’s normal cells, every cancer reflects the genetic differences that mark us as individuals. Add to that environmental influences like diet, tobacco use, the microbiome and even occupation, and the likelihood of finding a “single” pharmaceutical cure for cancer becomes virtually impossible.

But, while looking for a single cure for all cancers may not be a fruitful activity, defining a best practice for understanding the genetic and protein biomarkers of individual tumors is proving worthwhile.

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Microsatellite Instability Symposium at Duke University

On January 23, doctors, scientists and researchers will gather for a symposium about Microsatellite Instability (MSI) at Duke University. During the one-day event, scientists from Duke University and The Ohio State University will share insight into their research on biomarkers, MSI status and GI cancer, Lynch Syndrome, and MSI and DNA mismatch repair deficiency (dMMR).

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