Dealing with PCR Inhibitors

InhibitionThe polymerase chain reaction (PCR) has revolutionized modern biology as a quick and easy way to generate amazing amounts of genomic data. However, when PCR doesn’t work, it can be frustrating. At these times, PCR and reverse transcription PCR (RT-PCR) inhibitors seem to be everywhere: They lie dormant in your starting material and can co-purify with the template of interest, and they can be introduced during sample handling or reaction setup. The effects of these inhibitors can range from partial inhibition and underestimation of the target nucleic acid amount to complete amplification failure. What is a scientist to do?

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Preventing the Heartache of Cell Line Misidentification

Golden maskIt’s a scientist’s nightmare: Spending time and resources to investigate a biological phenomenon only to learn later that your cells are not what you think they are—their true identities hidden. As a result, all of the data that you’ve generated with those cells, published and unpublished, are cast into doubt. You thought that you knew your cells, that you could trust them, but your trust was misplaced. At some point, perhaps even before the traitorous cell line entered your laboratory, the cells were mislabeled, misidentified or contaminated with another cell line. It didn’t have to be this way. There are easy steps you can take to prevent the headache and heartache of cell line misidentification and contamination.

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Enhanced Protein Mass Spectrometry Analysis with Trypsin/Lys-C Mix

We recently presented a webinar illustrating the technical benefits of the new Trypsin/Lys-C Mix, Mass Spec Grade. The following is a summary of key attributes highlighted during the presentation:

Side-by-side Comparison of Trypsin and Trypsin/Lys-C Digestion for Missed Cleavages (% of total cleavages). All the digests used overnight 37°C incubation.
Side-by-side Comparison of Trypsin and Trypsin/Lys-C Digestion for Missed Cleavages (% of total cleavages). All the digests used overnight 37°C incubation.

Efficient proteolysis is a major requirement for protein mass spectrometry analysis. Incomplete digestion has multiple ramifications including decreased number of identified proteins, compromised analytical reproducibility and protein quantitation, etc. Trypsin is one of the most robust proteases and is characterized by efficient proteolysis. Typical trypsin reactions do not digest proteins to completion, missing 15–30% of cleavage sites. Incomplete digestion affects protein identification, reproducibility of mass spectrometry analysis and accuracy of protein quantitation. Supplementing Trypsin with Lys-C compensates for the majority of missed cleavages. Continue reading “Enhanced Protein Mass Spectrometry Analysis with Trypsin/Lys-C Mix”